Monthly Archives: May 2008

Immorality in the nation of Israel (Judges 19)

1) The 19th chapter of Judges begins our text.
a) At this time Israel had no centralized authority (the government was in a shambles).
b) Anarchy and injustice was the state of the nation.
2) In the latter part of verse 1 we find there was a man from the tribe of Levi living in some hill country.
3) The end of this verse says he took a “concubine” from Bethlehem.
4) “Concubine” may be thought of as a “lesser wife.”
5) The concubine became dissatisfied and left – verse 2 – READ
6) After a little time the wife was ready to go back with her husband.
7) Verse 9 – READ
8) The husband wanted to “get on the road.” Verse 10 – READ
a) They got to the city of Jerusalem – verses 10-11.
b) A servant was with the husband and wife and he suggested everyone stay in Jerusalem.
9) Verses 12-13 – READ
a) The couple, just like many travelers today, decided to keep going for a while.
b) They came to another place and decided to spend the night there – verse 15 – READ
10) An interesting statement is in this verse: “no man took them into his house to lodge.”
a) Travelers did not have access to the types of temporary lodging we have now.
b) Staying in Jerusalem was not safe.
11) This couple was finally approached by an old man – verse 16 – READ
a) Verse 17 – READ
b) At the end of verse 18 our travelers said to this fellow they had no place to stay.
12) Verse 19 says they had all the supplies they needed.
13) They lacked was a place to stay.
14) The old man said he would give these people all they needed; he said it was too dangerous to stay on the street.
15) Verse 20 – READ
a) After a time some people from the town came to visit.
b) One paraphrase refers to this group of visitors as “perverts.”
16) An event happened that was similar to the event involving Lot and the area of Sodom.
17) They had some plans for him that were vile – verse 22 – READ
18) The old man was a lot like Lot – he wanted to protect his house guests.
19) He Verse 23 – READ
20) Notice what we are told in 25a: READ
21) The rest of verse 25 says the wife (concubine) finally ended up outside the house.
22) This woman was treated very badly and finally killed.
23) The man took her back home but there was not a burial in the traditional sense of the word.
a) Verse 29 tells us the corpse of this wife was, in a sense, put forward for public viewing.
24) A key verse in this chapter is the last one – verse 30 – READ
a) People in Israel became aware of what had happened to this man’s wife.
b) Seeing the body of this woman stirred practically the entire nation to action.
25) Judg. 20:1-2, 3 – READ
a) The man in Judg. 19 got a first hand look at immorality; it affected his own family.
b) Immoral acts still bring great sadness to people.
26) A key point from Judg. 19, however, is this: God’s people responded to immorality.
27) Think of how our society regards immorality.
28) People have started to erase sin from their vocabulary.
29) We need to go back to the Bible and see how God defines sin.
a) We need to be the people who stand up in society and talk about immorality.
b) God is the moral judge of all people; morality is not judged by a poll.
c) It is not determined by a government, or from one generation to the next.

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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Who was Cain in the Old Testament?

Abel
(Heb. Hebhel), a breath, or vanity, the second son of Adam and Eve. He was put to death by his brother Cain (Gen 4:1-16). Guided by the instruction of their father, the two brothers were trained in the duty of worshipping God. “And in process of time” (marg. “at the end of days”, i.e., on the Sabbath) each of them offered up to God of the first-fruits of his labours. Cain, as a husbandman, offered the fruits of the field; Abel, as a shepherd, of the firstlings of his flock. “The Lord had respect unto Abel and his offering; but unto Cain and his offering he had not respect” (Gen 4:3-5). On this account Cain was angry with his brother, and formed the design of putting him to death; a design which he at length found an opportunity of carrying into effect (Gen 4:8,9. Comp. 1 John 3:12). There are several references to Abel in the New Testament. Our Saviour speaks of him as “righteous” (Matt 23:35). “The blood of sprinkling” is said to speak “better things than that of Abel” (Heb 12:24); i.e., the blood of Jesus is the reality of which the blood of the offering made by Abel was only the type. The comparison here is between the sacrifice offered by Christ and that offered by Abel, and not between the blood of Christ calling for mercy and the blood of the murdered Abel calling for vengeance, as has sometimes been supposed. It is also said (Heb 11:4) that “Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain.” This sacrifice was made “by faith;” this faith rested in God, not only as the Creator and the God of providence, but especially in God as the great Redeemer, whose sacrifice was typified by the sacrifices which, no doubt by the divine institution, were offered from the days of Adam downward. On account of that “faith” which looked forward to the great atoning sacrifice, Abel’s offering was accepted of God. Cain’s offering had no such reference, and therefore was rejected. Abel was the first martyr, as he was the first of our race to die. –Easton’s Bible Dictionary

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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What does the word "abba" mean?

This Syriac or Chaldee word is found three times in the New Testament (Mark 14:36; Rom 8:15; Gal 4:6), and in each case is followed by its Greek equivalent, which is translated “father.” It is a term expressing warm affection and filial confidence. It has no perfect equivalent in our language. It has passed into European languages as an ecclesiastical term, “abbot.” — Easton’s Bible Dictionary

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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How to be happy

If you want to be Happy, here are some things to practice….

¨ Seek to lead a quiet and peaceful life {I Tim. 2:2, I Thes. 4:11, Eph. 4:3}
¨ Count your blessings, don’t despise His goodness {Rom. 2:4}
¨ Laugh {Pro. 15:13}
¨ Be thankful {Col. 3:15, I Thes. 5:18}
¨ Be prayerful {I Thes. 5:17}
¨ Be unselfish {Phil. 2:4}
¨ Be concerned for the happiness of others {Pro. 18:24} (You have an impact on others happiness)
¨ Be caring, helpful {I John 3:17}
¨ Be loving {I Cor. 13:13}
¨ Be humble {Micah 6:8, Pro. 29:23}
¨ Be respectful {I Pet. 2:17}
¨ Be courteous {I Pet. 3:8,9}
¨ Be content {I Tim. 6:6}
¨ Be active {Rom. 2:7}
¨ Look inward, not outward {2 Cor. 13:5}
¨ Talk to yourself often, be honest {Psa. 119:11}
¨ Don’t blame others take responsibility for your actions,{Ecc. 12:14, Rom. 2:6}
¨ Realize your days are numbered {Psa. 90:12} (Life is too short to waste)
¨ Listen to others who love you enough to give you wisdom {Pro. 3:13}
¨ Love people, not things.
¨ Look forward with excitement and have a vision for yourself.
¨ Change your future by learning from the past.
¨ Leave the past in the past, don’t drag it around with you {Phil. 3:13, Eph. 4:26} (bitterness spoils happiness)
¨ Live modestly {I Tim. 6:9-10}
¨ Make the decision to be happy {Pro. 29:18}
¨ Have a plan, don’t leave things to chance {Pro. 4:26}
¨ Make good things happen {Mat. 12:35}
¨ Learn to be adaptable, change is the only thing that stays the same {1 Jn. 2:17}
¨ Actively manage your life: {Pro. 16:20}
? Relationship to God
? Relationship to people
? Health (as best as you can)
? Finances
? Behaviors
? Decisions

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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"How Does God Find Pleasure?"

God could not enjoy winning a competition, He never loses. He could not enjoy an abundance of material things, He owns everything.

Since God is not threatened by a lack of anything; and since He is not threatened with eternal damnation, where does He find pleasure?

The Bible tells us that God takes pleasure in helping those who fear Him (Psalm 147:11). He takes pleasure in seeing those who fear Him prosper (Psalm 35:27). Adopting men through the blood of Christ is according to His good pleasure (Ephesians 1:5). It is also His good pleasure to give His disciples the Kingdom (Luke 12:32).

God does not desire any to perish, but that all might come to repentance (2Peter 3:9). Therefore, God finds pleasure when one repents of sin and turns to Him.

Jesus found pleasure in always doing the things that pleased God the Father (John 8:39). That’s why God found pleasure in Jesus (Isaiah 42:1). Since Jesus is our Example (1Peter 2:21), God will find pleasure in us if we do only those things that please Him.

God takes pleasure in helping others. In 2Chronicles 16:9, we are told that the eyes of the Lord go to and fro throughout the earth looking for those whose heart is perfect toward Him in order to show Himself strong in their behalf.

Why do you and I take pleasure in helping others who have a genuine need? Because we are made in the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27). Think of all the things you have sacrificed to try and set your children on the right path of life. Do you feel bad about that? Of course not! Why? Because you are created in the image of God.

Are you looking for real meaning and purpose in life? It can only be found by doing those things in which God finds pleasure, because we are made in His image. You may have an abundance of “things” but still have a void in your life. To fill it, do the things that Jesus did, that is, always doing the things that please God (John 8:39), and helping others (Acts 10:38b). — Toby Miller

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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Who was the “Aaron” of the Old Testament?

He was the oldest son of Amram and Jochebed, a daughter of Levi (Ex 6:20). He was born in Egypt three years before his brother Moses and a number of years after his sister Miriam (2:1,4; 7:7). He was married to Elisheba, the daughter of Amminadab of the house of Judah (6:23; 1 Chron 2:10). He had four sons with her (Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar).

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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The salvation of Cornelius (Acts 10-11)

1) One of the most important conversions in the book of Acts is Cornelius and his house.
2) This conversion is described in both Acts 10 and Acts 11.

3) Cornelius was lost . He had to “hear words” to receive salvation.
a) Cornelius may have been one of the finest men that has ever lived.
b) Acts 10:22 says a lot of Jewish people looked at this man and said he was a fine fellow.
4) He was “devout” (religious), Acts 10:2
a) Today people often say someone is “saved” because they are religious.
b) Our culture seems to equate almost any type of religious faith with heaven.
5) Cornelius proves religion is not an indicator of or proof of salvation.
6) He was religious, but He did not have a right relationship with God.
7) If that had been the case, Peter would not have needed to come and instruct him about spiritual things.
8) Acts 10:2 also says Cornelius feared God – this also was not enough.
a) The world assumes that thinking kindly about God and not speaking speak badly about him results in salvation.
b) Religion and respect for God do not save.

9) Cornelius was a giver. He helped the poor.
10) We would call him a “generous” man.
11) Cornelius tells us that giving money is not the way to salvation.
a) Cornelius’ life also consisted of prayer (this is stated at the end of verse 2).
b) His prayer life was very regular, but it did not save him.
12) Because Cornelius was in a state of condemnation he had to find a preacher –Acts 10:5 – READ.
a) Acts 11 tells us exactly why Peter was needed – verse 14 –READ
b) Cornelius had to hear “words” (a message). We also learn of the purpose behind this message.
13) Cornelius learned that he had to “do” some things so He could “receive” some things.
14) A person may have what we would regard as an excellent moral character.
15) Until someone hears and obeys the words of Christ, he is lost.
16) Cornelius was told by an angel to make contact with Peter (Acts 10:3), but this did not saved him.

17) Some point out from Acts 10 that Cornelius received the Holy Spirit and this is true.
a) Cornelius and his house did receive the Holy Spirit, but this did not save him or his family.
b) Acts 11:15 – READ

18) Verse 14 does not say Cornelius was saved by the Holy Spirit. Remember what was learned earlier.
a) “Words” were going to save this man and the other people in his household.
19) Verse 15 says Peter “began to speak.” Peter did not get a chance to speak the needed words.
20) He started to speak and then came the Holy Spirit.
21) If words were supposed to save this man, why did the Holy Spirit interrupt the speaker?
22) The Holy Spirit proved that it was okay to speak the “words of salvation” (verse 14).
23) Back in Mt. 16 Jesus said Peter would have “keys to the kingdom.”

24) Peter not only opened the door for this man and his house, he commanded them to be obedient.
25) Verse 48 of Acts 10.
26) Cornelius became a “saved man” when he obeyed the gospel.
a) Cornelius could have said he did not need Peter; he had all the religion he wanted.
b) He gave, he prayed, God was an important part of his life. He could have said he was satisfied.
c) This is what we hear from many people today.

27) People have a system of religion they like, they believe it works for them, so they will not change.
28) Cornelius was a great man in part because he was willing to listen to the truth.
29) What really made him special was his being willing to obey the truth.
30) His attitude is more fully expressed in verse 33 of Acts 10 – READ
a) This man said “we want to hear it all.”
b) ALL is a key word.
31) Have we found the Father through the Son?
32) Do we use the Son on a regular basis to maintain our relationship with God?

Get a FREE on-line Romans commentary at http://www.abiblecommentary.com. You may also order this commentary in book form for just $14.95 (it is a great addition to your library, or an ideal gift for friends, a special Bible class teacher or a cherished minister. The next commentary for release will be First Corinthians and we expect that will be out soon!

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